Primary Schools

The 2017 GUS report on fatherhood stated: ‘Children who have a poor relationship with their father are also the most likely to report disliking school and a poor relationship with their teacher.’

A great Dad (male carer) plays a vital role in their child's education. Dads need to be involved and sometimes encouraged to come into school and spend time with their children. We want to help schools and communities break down barriers, and make them more father friendly. As Fathers Network Scotland say: Dads in Scotland are significantly less likely than mums to form positive partnerships with their school.

We have worked in multiple Primary schools. Our work includes:

Dads* Nights, Workshops for staff, Workshops for Boys, Workshops for children

We work with the families in a collaborative manner, and together we have also produced movies inspired by the children and Dads. If you work in a school, or have a child at Primary and would like us to come work with you, then please get in touch, email Hello@dadsrock.org.uk.


Secondary Schools

Over 80% of men will become fathers at some point in their life. Whilst this is a huge percentage, there is very little in life that prepares young men for becoming dads. The aim of our work in Secondary schools is to address this by starting the conversation on what it means to be a Dad today. We aim to challenge stereotypes and question the difference between Dads and Mums, looking at gender equality.

Our workshops cover: 1. The role of a Dad 2. Relationships 3. Mental Health for men 4. Brain Development for babies. Young men have given us the following feedback about the workshops: "You could say whatever you wanted to say." "You're just free to speak." "We've just never really like had that before." "It was different to the usual like stuff we get." "Everyone was involved in the conversation. You were just free to speak, to say what you wanted." "You could actually just be like people." We also work with girls to discuss the same issues and talk about the importance of Dads.